Reference Database for the World's Submachine Guns

This is a work in progress!

This will hopefully be a near-complete guide to international submachine guns from 1914 to 1970. Currently available are:
Austria - Belgium - Canada - Denmark - France - Finland - Germany - Hungary - Italy - Japan- Spain - Sweden - United Kingdom

Coming soon!:

- Switzerland

- Argentina

- Australia/NZ

- China

- Egypt

If I have made any errors, omitted any data, or anything else, please feel free to get in touch at foreverbreathesthelonelyword@gmail.com.

Austria

Austria had an innovative arms industry in the early 20th century, employing prolific designers like Ferdinand Mannlicher, Georg Roth, and Karel Krnka. It is perhaps no surprise, then, that some of the earliest SMGs and machine pistols were developed in Austria, beginning with the unusual water-cooled Hellriegel submachine gun, which was more akin to a miniature LMG than a true SMG. Towards the end of World War I, the Steyr factory produced 9x23mm copies of the Italian Villar Perosa, which were used by Austrian stormtroopers, but not many were made before the war came to an end. After the war, most of Austria's SMG prototypes were destroyed and development had to begin again from scratch. In the late 1920s, Steyr was bought out by the Swiss firm of Solothurn and produced Solothurn S1-100 SMGs for the Austrian Army and Police, under the designation MP34, and following the annexation of the country by Nazi Germany in 1938, the Austrians shared all their equipment with the Wehrmacht. After World War II Austria was restored to independence and has continued to produce quality arms, including SMGs, through Steyr-Mannlicher.

Hellriegel
Hellriegel
Year:
1915

Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Mr. Hellriegel
 Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Very early SMG concept, fed from belt-like chute; few details remain
Sturmpistole M18
Sturmpistole
Year:
1917
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
32.1in (82cm)
Weight:
9.2lb (4.2kg)
Magazine:
25 rounds (x2)
Rate of Fire:
2400rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Waffenfabrik Steyr
Notes:
Austrian copy of the Italian Villar Perosa
Austrian MPUnidentified Year:
N/A
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
31in (78cm)
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
N/A (Possibly Steyr)
Notes:
Unusual recoil-operated SMG of unknown identity, probably first to feed through pistol grip, dated to around 1918
Steyr-Solothurn S1-100 1930 Steyr-Solothurn Model 1930 Year:
1930
Cartridge:
9x19mm
9x23mm
Length:
33.5in (85cm)
Weight:
8.8lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Theodor Rakula
Manufacturer(s):
Solothurn AG,
Steyr-Daimler-Puch
Notes:
German-Swiss design produced under license in Austria, adopted by Austrian police in 1930
Steyr Model 1934 Steyr-Solothurn Model 1934
Year:
1934
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
9x23mm,
9x25mm,
.45 ACP
Length:
33.5in (85cm)
Weight:
8.6lb (3.9kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Theodor Rakula
Manufacturer(s):
Steyr-Daimler-Puch
Notes:
Modified version of Model 1930 SMG with redesigned safety; adopted by Austrian Army in 1934
Steyr MPi69
Steyr MPi69
Year:
1969
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26.4in (67cm)
Weight:
6.9lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
25 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Stowasser
Manufacturer(s):
Steyr-Daimler-Puch
Notes:
Uzi-type SMG with wrap-around bolt; can accept bayonet

Belgium

Belgium in the late 19th and early 20th century was one of the world's most renowned manufacturers and exporters of small arms, predominantly due to the efforts of the famous firm of Fabrique Nationale in Liege. FN's line of rifles and pistols were always popular but the company had great difficult tapping into the emerging submachine gun market in the interwar period; initially they took up the design of one Karl Heinemann, a German engineer, but this failed to attract any buyers. During World War II, Belgium's arms factories were taken over by the Germans and the great Belgian designers like Dudioenne Saive continued their work at RSAF Enfield in Britain. When the war ended, FN were restored to their former glory and had huge success with their FAL rifle and MAG machine gun, but no luck with a blowback SMG that they attempted to market in the 1950s. Instead, FN opted to take up production of the Israeli Uzi submachine gun, which proved successful, while Belgium's army adopted the Vigneron M2 SMG.

Pieper M34
Pieper M34
Year:
1928
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.75in (80.6cm)
Weight:
10.40lb (4.73kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
Manufacturer(s):
Anciens Etablissements Pieper
Notes:
German-designed SMG produced under license in Belgium
FN-Heinemann MP35
FN M1935
Year:
1935

Cartridge:
7.63x25mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Karl Heinemann
 Manufacturer(s):
FN Herstal
Notes:
German-designed SMG using toggle action mechanism
FN Saive
FN Saive
Year:
c.1950
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.50in (87.6cm)
Weight:
9.80lb (4.4kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Dieudonne Saive
Manufacturer(s):
FN Herstal
Notes:
Also offered with folding magazine and wire stock
Vigneron
Vigneron
Year:
1951
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.90in (88.6cm)
Weight:
8.11lb (6.8kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
620rpm
Designer(s):
Georges Vigneron
Manufacturer(s):
Precision Liegoise
Notes:
Adopted by Belgian Army in 1953
Imperia
Imperia MI53
Year:
1953
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.80in (80.8cm)
Weight:
8.40lb (3.82kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Imperia
Notes:
Basic Sten clone using surplus components
RAN
RAN
Year:
1953
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.20in (79.2cm)
Weight:
7.80lb (3.60kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
620rpm
Designer(s):
Witold Porebski
Manufacturer(s):
Repousmetal
Notes:
Capable of firing Energa anti-tank grenades
FN Uzi
FN Uzi
Year:
1958
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.20in (64.0cm)
Weight:
8.80lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Uziel Gal
Manufacturer(s):
FN Herstal
Notes:
Israeli-designed SMG produced under license in Belgium
FN Vervier
FN Vervier
Year:
1962
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Ernest Vervier
Manufacturer(s):
FN Herstal
Notes:
Built as a prototype only

Canada

Like the rest of the Commonwealth, Canada was largely reliant upon Britain for arms before World War II. When the war broke out, the needs of the Canadian Army were supplied by Long Branch Arsenal, and they were equipped with the same weapons as their British counterparts. During the war Small Arms Ltd. (later absorbed into Canadian Arsenals Ltd.) produced several experimental weapons for the military, but none of these were ultimately accepted for service. The post-war Canadian Army was satisfied with the Sterling SMG and had no desire to develop any new designs.

Villar Perosa
Revelli (Villar Perosa)
Year:
1918

Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
21.0in (53.0cm)
Weight:
14.3lb (6.5kg)
Magazine:
25 rounds (x2)
Rate of Fire:
2400rpm
Designer(s):
Abiel Revelli
 Manufacturer(s):
Canadian General Electric Co.
Notes:
Licensed production of Italian Villar Perosa, marketed for export
Sten Mk.II Canada
Sten Mk.II
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76cm)
Weight:
6.65lb (3.02kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
Long Branch Arsenal (Small Arms Ltd.)
Notes:
Locally-produced version of the British Sten gun; primary Canadian SMG of WWII
Sten Mk.III Canada
Sten Mk.III
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
Long Branch Arsenal (Small Arms Ltd.)
Notes:
As above
SAL Model 2
SAL Model 2
Year:
1944

Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Anton Roscziszewski
 Manufacturer(s):
Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Modified Sten Mk.II with rotary magazine and two-stage trigger
XP54
SAL XP54
Year:
1947
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.3in (64cm)
Weight:
7.10lb (3.22kg)
Magazine:
28 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Anton Rosziszewski
Manufacturer(s):
Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Magazine inserted horizontally under length of the receiver
NAACO Borealis
NAACO Borealis
Year:
1948
Cartridge:
.45 NAACO
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
20 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Russell Sutherland
Robert Herman
Manufacturer(s):
North American Arms Corporation
Notes:
Full-auto conversion of NAACO Brigadier pistol with extended barrel and buttstock
Sterling L2A4
Sterling L2A4
Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.0in (71cm)
Weight:
6.0lb (2.7kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designers(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.
Notes:
Modified Sterling Mk.IV with spike bayonet; built as a prototype only
C1
Sterling C1
Year:
1958
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.0in (69cm)
Weight:
6.5lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Canadian Arsenals Ltd.
Notes:
Licensed copy of the Sterling Mk.IV, adopted by the Canadian Army in 1958
RCAF Sten
RCAF Sten
Year:
1964
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Canadian Arsenals Ltd.
Notes:
Modified Sten Mk.II with spike bayonet and foregrip; intended for issue to Air Force
Douglas Recoilless
Douglas Recoilless
Year:
1969
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Clifford N. Douglas
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Bullpup SMG with recoil-operated magazine feed and helical magazine

Denmark

Although a largely peaceful nation in the 20th century, Denmark maintained an arms industry that both supplied its own military and exported internationally. The first submachine gun produced in Denmark was a German design by Theodore Emil Bergmann, who contracted the firm of Schultz & Larsen in 1932 to produce his gun. It was adopted by the Danish Army and also sold to their neighbor Sweden. After World War II, the Danish Industry Syndicate began producing a line of new submachine guns offered in various models. The Model 50 was a relative success, but faced stiff competition from the Swedish Carl Gustav SMG.

Bergmann BMK-32
Bergmann BMK-32
Year:
1932

Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.6in (95.5cm)
Weight:
8.9lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
650rpm
Designer(s):
Theodore E. Bergmann, Mr. Muler
 Manufacturer(s):
Schultz & Larsen, Junker & Ruth AG
Notes:
Designed in Germany and produced in Denmark under license
Lettet Forsogs
Lettet Forsogs
Year:
1939
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
C.J.V. Berg
Manufacturer(s):
N/A (Probably DISA)
Notes:
Lightened experimental variant of Finnish Suomi KP/31 SMG
Madsen Suomi
Madsen Model 40
Year:
1940
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.25in (87.0cm)
Weight:
10.3lb (4.7kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Dansk Industri Syndikat
Notes:
Danish licensed variant of the Finnish Suomi KP/31 SMG; also known as P2
Madsen M45
Madsen Model 45
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80.1cm)
Weight:
7.1lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
850rpm
Designer(s):
Marius Gunnergaard-Poulsen
Manufacturer(s):
Dansk Industri Syndikat
Notes:
Also known as P16; fixed stock model also produced, known as P13
Danish Hovea Hovea Model 49
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.8in (81cm)
Weight:
7.4lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Haerens Vapenarsenalet
Notes:
Originally a Swedish design, produced in Denmark under license
Madsen Model 50
Madsen Model 50
Year:
1950
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.25in (79.3cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Erik Saetter
Manufacturer(s):
Dansk Industri Syndikat
Notes:
Body constructed from stamped steel frame that hinges open
Madsen Model 52Madsen Model 53 Year:
1952
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Erik Saetter
Manufacturer(s):
Dansk Industri Syndikat
Notes:
Improved version of Model 50

France

Plans to introduce an SMG into French military service were not conceived until after World War I, with the development of the STA submachine gun in the mid-1920s. Although a promising weapon, it was cancelled after only a limited production span and the project fell through. It was not until the late 1930s that the French adopted an SMG proper, which came in the form of the unusual MAS-38. This was chambered for a proprietary 7.65mm cartridge which was widely felt to be underpowered and ineffective in comparison to the more popular 9x19mm round. By the time the Germans invaded in 1940, not enough of these guns had been produced or issued and the French Army was essentially without an SMG.

After the war, the French decided to adopt the 9x19mm cartridge like the rest of Europe and desired a new, domestically-made submachine gun. Three state factories were called upon to design these, and in the end it was the entrant from Tulle that won out. This gun, the MAT-49, was the standard French SMG until their adoption of the FAMAS assault rifle in the late 1970s.

STA 1924
STA 1924
Year:
1924

Cartridge:
9x19mm

Length:
32.8in (83cm)
Weight:
7.7lb (3.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
 Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Etienne
Notes:
Based on the Bergmann MP18
MAS-24
MAS-24
Year:
1924
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Etienne
Notes:
Utilized unusual slanted receiver and bolt guide
ETVS
ETVS
Year:
1933
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
26.4in (67cm)
Weight:
13.1lb (5.95kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Etablissement Technique de Versailles
Notes:
Featured folding stock and magazine
SE-MAS 35
MAS-35
Year:
1935
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
24.9in (63.2cm)
Weight:
6.38lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Etienne
Notes:
Prototype; later developed into MAS-38 SMG

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

CEV
Year:
1936
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Commission d'Experiences de Versailles
Notes:
Prototype

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

CEI
Year:
1936
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Commission d'Experience de l'Infanterie
Notes:
Prototype
Petter
Petter
Year:
1937
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
25.4in (65cm)
Weight:
14.1lb (6.39kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Charles G. Petter
Manufacturer(s):
Societe Alsacienne de Constructions Mecaniques
Notes:
Featured folding stock and magazine, possibly first SMG to use L-shaped bolt
MAS-38
MAS-38
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
7.65x20mm
Length:
24.9in (63.2cm)
Weight:
6.4lb (2.90kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Etienne
Notes:
Adopted by the French Army in 1938
MAC-47
MAC-47
Year:
1947
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25in (63.5cm)
Weight:
4.6lb (2.1kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
640rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Chatellerault
Notes:
Utilized unconventional torsion-delayed blowback system
MAC-48MAC-48 Year:
1948
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.6lb (3.44kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
475rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Chatellerault
Notes:
Derived from the Sten
MAC 48 LS
MAC-48 L.S.
Year:
1948
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.24in (64.1cm)
Weight:
6.0lb (2.7kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Chatellerault
Notes:
Lightened and simplified version of MAC-48; taken into limited service
MAS-48
MAS-48
Year:
1948
Cartridge:
9x19mm
.30 Carbine
Length:
25.5in (65cm)
Weight:
6.6lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Saint-Etienne
Notes:
Featured L-shaped bolt and folding magazine, based on Petter design
MAT-49
MAT-49
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26in (66cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Pierre Monteil
Manufacturer(s):
Manufacture d'Armes de Tulle
Notes:
Adopted by the French Army in 1950
Hotchkiss Type 011
Hotchkiss Model 11
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
29.92in (76.0cm)
Weight:
7.28lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Hotchkiss et Cie
Notes:
N/A
Hotchkiss Universal
Hotchkiss Universal
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30.6in (78cm)
Weight:
7.5lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Hotchkiss et Cie
Notes:
Utilized folding magazine and stock
Gevarm
Gevarm
Year:
1950
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.2in (79cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Gevelot Extrusion
Notes:
Basic Sten clone, offered with retractable stock and fixed stock
PM-9
MGD PM-9
Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.5in (65cm)
Weight:
10.45lb (4.74lb)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Louis Bonnet de Camille
Manufacturer(s):
Societe Pour l'Exploration des Brevets MGD
Notes:
Utilized flywheel-delayed blowback mechanism; incorporated folding magazine and stock
308Brandt
Year:
1956
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.2in (94cm)
Weight:
8.38lb (3.80kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Hotchkiss-Brandt
Notes:
Utilized folding magazine
Hotchkiss Type 304
Brandt Model 304
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.86in (86.0cm)
Weight:
7.05lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Hotchkiss-Brandt
Notes:
Utilized folding magazine

Finland

Formerly part of the Russian Empire, Finland gained its independence in 1917 and was immedietly beset by both domestic struggles and the threat of invasion by the Soviets. As such, it built up its own military and arms industry. Finland was an early adopter of the submachine gun, importing and producing SIG-Bergmann SMGs in the 1920s. In 1931 the Finnish Defence Forces decided to adopt a domestic design by the talented engineer Aimo Lahti. This submachine gun, known as the "Suomi", was highly reputable and saw extensive use during the Winter War of 1939, where captured examples were studied by Soviet engineers.

The Suomi SMG remained in use during the Continuation War against the Soviet Union, but proved too expensive for Finland's struggling industrial base, so a cheap copy of the Russian PPS-42 SMG was introduced instead. After World War II, the Suomi remained in service, but by the time assault rifles were introduced to the Finnish Army, production of submachine guns ceased. In the 1990s, a Finnish-designed SMG known as the Jati-Matic briefly appeared, but was never made in great numbers.

SIG-Bergmann
SIG-Bergmann
Year:
1922

Cartridge:
7.65x21mm
Length:
32in (81.2cm)
Weight:
9.0lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser,
Gotthard End
 Manufacturer(s):
Lindelof Konetehdas
Notes:
Local copy of SIG-Bergmann M1920
Lahti M22
Lahti Model 1922
Year:
1922
Cartridge:
7.65x21mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Featured quick-change barrel; built as a prototype only
Lahti M24
Lahti Model 1924
Year:
1924
Cartridge:
7.65x21mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Built with dual magazine feed
Suomi M26Lahti Model 1926 Year:
1926
Cartridge:
7.65x21mm,
9x25mm
Length:
36.5in (93cm)
Weight:
9.75lb (4.42kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Only produced in limited numbers
Suomi KP31
Suomi KP Model 1931
Year:
1932
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.25in (87cm)
Weight:
10.3lb (4.7kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Standard Finnish SMG of World War II
Suomi KP/34
Suomi Model 1934
Year:
1934
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
10.0lb (4.7kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Top-loading SMG designed for commercial export
AL43
Lahti AL43
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
7.62x35mm
Length:
39in (99cm)
Weight:
12lb (5.6kg)
Magazine:
56 rounds
Rate of Fire:
800rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
Manufacturer(s):
Valtion Kivaaritehdas
Notes:
Chambered for intermediate cartridges; technically an assault rifle but contemporaneously considered an SMG
KP M/44
KP Model 1944
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.71in (83.1cm)
Weight:
6.2lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
650rpm
Designer(s):
Willi Daugs
Manufacturer(s):
Tikkakoski Oy
Notes:
Copy of Russian PPS-43 SMG, modified to feed from Suomi magazines
Carl Pelo SMG
Pelo
Year:
1956
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
15.40in (39.1cm)
Weight:
5.60lb (2.54kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Carl Pelo
Manufacturer(s):
SAKO
Notes:
Fed by fixed box magazine loaded with 30-round clips


Germany


Bergmann MP18.I
Bergmann MP18.I
Year:
1918

Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.1 in (82 cm)
Weight:
9.2 lb (4.2 kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
 Manufacturer(s):
Theodor Bergmann GmbH
Notes:
Adopted and fielded by the German Army in World War I
Walther 1918
Walther
Year:
c.1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Fritz Walther
Manufacturer(s):
Carl Walther GmbH
Notes:
Experimental SMG fed by Lewis-type flat pan magazine

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

Simson
Year:
c.1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Simson & Co. Waffenfabrik
Notes:
Converted from Gewehr 98 rifle
Schwarzlose 08/18
Schwarzlose
Year:
c.1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
80 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Andreas Schwarzlose
Manufacturer(s):
Andreas Schwarzlose GmbH
Notes:
Fed by staggered 80-round box consisting of eight 10-round clips
Rheinmetall MP20
Rheinmetall MP20
Year:
1920
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s);
Louis Stange
Manufacturer(s):
Rheinmetall
Notes:
Developed into the later Steyr-Solothurn S1-100 submachine gun
VMP 30
VMP
Year:
1925
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.43in (95.1cm)
Weight:
9.92lb (4.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designers(s):
Heinrich Vollmer
Manufacturer(s):
Will & Kohler GmbH
Notes:
Precursor to the later EMP submachine gun
Haenel MP28.II
Haenel MP28.II
Year:
1928
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
.45 ACP
Length:
32.0in (81cm)
Weight:
8.8lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
Manufacturer(s):
C.G. Haenel GmbH
Notes:
Improved version of Bergmann MP18.I submachine gun with fire selector
Heinemann MP32
Heinemann MP32
Year:
1932
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Karl Heinemann
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Utilized toggle-lock action; production rights later sold to FN Herstal
Mauser MP33
Mauser MP33
Year:
1933
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
33.0in (84cm)
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH
Notes:
Possibly also offered in 9x19mm and 7.63x25mm
Erma EMP
EMP
Year:
1934
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.4in (95cm)
Weight:
9.2lb (4.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Heinrich Vollmer,
Berthold Geipel
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Developed from earlier VMP submachine gun; supplied to Spain in large numbers
BMP 35
BMP
Year:
1934
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.6in (96cm)
Weight:
8.9lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Theodore E. Bergmann,
Herr Muler
Manufacturer(s):
Carl Walther GmbH,
Junker & Ruh A.G.
Notes:
Magazine feed located on right side of receiver; adopted by Waffen-SS during World War II
Schmeisser MK36
Schmeisser MK36.III
Year:
1936
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
44.5in (113cm)
Weight:
10.5lb (4.8kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
400rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
Manufacturer(s):
C.G. Haenel GmbH
Notes:
SMG disguised in a rifle stock; built as a prototype only
Erma MP36
EMP 36
Year:
1936
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Heinrich Vollmer, Berthold Geipel
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Precursor of later MP38 SMG
Erma MP38
Erma MP38
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.8in (83cm)
Weight:
9.0 (4.1kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Heinrich Vollmer
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Compact, steel-built SMG intended for parachutists; adopted by Wehrmacht in 1938
Erma MP40
Erma MP40
Year:
1940
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.8in (83cm)
Weight:
8.9lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Heinrich Vollmer
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Detail improvement of MP38 SMG; standard German SMG of WWII
Haenel MP41
Haenel MP41
Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.0in (86cm)
Weight:
8.2lb (3.7kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
Manufacturer(s):
C.G. Haenel GmbH
Notes:
"Hybrid" model combining features of MP28.II and MP40 SMGs; adopted by Waffen-SS during WWII
FMP-1
FMP-1
Year:
c.1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
24.0in (61cm)
Weight:
7.39lb (3.35kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Remotely-controlled turret gun derived from MP28.II action
EMP 44
EMP 44
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.4in (72.0cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
x2 32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Very basic SMG with dual magazine feed; only limited numbers made
Gerat Potsdam
Gerat Potsdam
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30.0in (76cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin, Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH
Notes:
Straight copy of British Sten SMG
Mauser MP3008
MP3008
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.3in (80cm)
Weight:
6.5lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH,
Blohm & Voss,
various others
Notes:
Copy of British Sten SMG with minor modifications
Coenders SMG
Coenders
Year:
c.1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
1000rpm
Designer(s):
August Coenders
Manufacturer(s):
N/A (Possibly Brno)
Notes:
Belt-fed SMG; built as a prototype only
Dux 51
Dux
Year:
1951
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.5in (83cm)
Weight:
7.7lb (3.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
650rpm
Designer(s):
Willi Daugs,
Ludwig Vorgrimmler
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH,
Sauer & Sohn,
J.G. Anshutz
Notes:
Copy of Finnish KP/44 SMG
MGD PM9
MGD PM-9
Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.5in (65cm)
Weight:
5.6lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
32 rounds
Designer(s):
Louis Bonnet de Camille
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
French-designed SMG sold to Erma in the mid-1950s
Erma MP56
Erma MP56
Year:
1956
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.0in (69cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Louis Bonnet de Camille
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
French-designed SMG sold to Erma
Mauser MP57
Mauser MP57
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
24.0in (61cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
800rpm
Designer(s):
Louis Bonnet de Camille
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH
Notes:
French-designed SMG sold to Mauser; same design as the Erma MP56
Erma Panzer 58
Erma SMART
Year:
1958
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Featured muzzle device to fire anti-tank grenades
Erma MP58
Erma MP58
Year:
1958
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.6in (70cm)
Weight:
6.6lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
670rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Basic SMG patterned after MP40; made as a prototype only
Erma MP59
Erma MP59
Year:
1959
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.8in (73cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
620rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Featured hydraulic buffer spring; made as a prototype only
Erma MP61
Erma MP60
Year:
1960
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.1in (79cm)
Weight:
7.3lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Josef Eder
Manufacturer(s):
ERMA Werke
Notes:
Used twin return springs; MP61 and MP64 prototypes also made
Mauser MP60
Mauser MP60
Year:
1960
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30.3in (77cm)
Weight:
 
5.5lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Ludwig Vorgrimmler,
Herr Kimmick
Manufacturer(s):
Mauser GmbH
Notes:
Featured muzzle device to fire anti-tank grenades
Walther MPL
Walther MP
Year:
1963
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
MPL:
29.4in (75cm)
MPK:
26.0in (66cm)
Weight:
MPL:
6.6lb (3.0kg)
MPK:
6.3lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Carl Walther GmbH
Notes:
Utilized L-shaped bolt, very similar to Franchi LF-57 SMG
HK54
Heckler & Koch MP54
Year:
1966
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26.0in (66cm)
Weight:
6.7lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
650rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Heckler & Koch GmbH
Notes:
Adopted by West German police as the MP5


Hungary

Hungary's arms manufacturers in the 20th century largely existed to serve their internal military needs rather than international export. The Danuvia plant had the fortune of employing Pal de Kiraly, a talented and ambitious engineer who had an interest in SMGs. He devised an unusual lever-delayed gun that was adopted by the Hungarian Army as the 39M, with several variants being made. This SMG was well-regarded but was too expensive and complex to produce in any great volumes, and Kiraly was in the process of designing a cheaper alternative when the country was invaded by the Soviets in 1944. Kiraly fled to the Dominican Republic and Hungary, as part of the Eastern Bloc, was required to adopt the standardized Kalashnikov assault rifle. Hungary did produce PPSh-41 SMGs under the designation 48M for a while after the war, but generally the issue of the AK made submachine guns obsolete in Hungarian service.

Frommer
Frommer M.17
Year:
1917

Cartridge:
7.65x17mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
25 rounds (x2)
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Rudolf Frommer
 Manufacturer(s):
Fegyver es Gepgyar
Notes:
Villar Perosa copy constructed from two Frommer Stop machine pistols
Danuvia 39M Danuvia 39M
Year:
1939
Cartridge:
9x25mm
Length:
45.25in (104.8cm)
Weight:
8.2lb (3.7kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Pal de Kiraly
Manufacturer(s):
Danuvia Arms Plant,
Fegyver es Gepgyar
Notes:
Utilized complex lever-delay blowback system; magazine folds into recess in handguard
Danuvia 44M
Danuvia 43M
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x25mm
Length:
37.5in (95cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.63kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
Pal de Kiraly
Manufacturer(s):
Danuvia Arms Plant,
Fegyver es Gepgyar
Notes:
Modified version of 39M with pistol grip and folding stock
Danuvia 44M
Danuvia 44M
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x25mm
Length:
19.7in (50cm)
Weight:
6.44lb (2.92kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
Pal de Kiraly
Manufacturer(s):
Danuvia Arms Plant
Notes:
Cheaper variant of Danuvia SMG utilizing basic construction; built as a prototype only
Kucher K1 Kucher K1
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
7.62x25mm
Length:
33.2in (84.4cm)
Weight:
6.8lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
35 rounds
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
Josef Kucher
Manufacturer(s):
Danuvia Arms Plant
Notes:
Taken into limited service with Hungarian police and Army

Italy

Italy's submachine gun development began in 1914, with the invention of the twin-barreled, pistol-calibre "Villar Perosa" gun by Colonel Abiel Revelli. The Italian Army recognized the potential in the concept and it was subsequently adapted into a single-barreled automatic carbine by Beretta. The Revelli-Beretta SMG of 1918 became the first conventional submachine gun to see military adoption, albeit in small numbers compared to the German MP18. After the war, various Italian firms continued to experiment with SMG design, but it was really Beretta who made strides in this field and progressively continued work on their 1918 gun.

 When World War II broke out, Italian troops were armed with one of the finest SMGs available, the Beretta Model 38. Many more quality SMGs were produced during the turbulent period from 1943 - 1945, in which Italy was split between the fascist republic and the monarchy, the former allied with Hitler's Germany and the latter allied with Britain and the US. After the war, Italy continued to produce submachine guns for both their domestic military and law enforcement, and for the export market. Some of these, especially Beretta's efforts, were very successful, thanks to the skills of engineers like Tullio Marengoni and Dominco Salza.

Villar Perosa
Fiat Mod.1915 ("Villar Perosa")
Year:
1914

Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
21.0in (53cm)
Weight:
14.3lb (6.5kg)
Magazine:
25 rounds (x2)
Rate of Fire:
2400rpm
Designer(s):
Abiel Revelli
 Manufacturer(s):
Officine di Villar Perosa,
FIAT
Notes:
World's first submachine gun, originally intended for bicycle troops
FIAT Fiat-Revelli
Year:
1916
Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
 
25 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Abiel Revelli
Manufacturer(s):
FIAT
Notes:
First attempt to convert Villar Perosa into a conventional SMG

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

Cei-Rigotti
Year:
1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
25 rounds
Rate of Fire:
800rpm
Designer(s):
Amerigo Cei-Rigotti
Manufacturer(s):
N/A (Possibly Glisenti-Bettoni & C.)
Notes:
Conversion of Villar Perosa into single-barreled SMG

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

Ansaldo Crocetti
Year:
1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A  
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Enrico Crocetti
Manufacturer(s):
Gio. Ansaldo & C.
Notes:
Trialed in 1918, few details survive
MAB 18
Revelli-Beretta
Year:
1918
Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
33.5in (85cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
 
25 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
First conventional SMG to see military service; adapted from Villar Perosa
Revelli
Revelli
Year:
1921
Cartridge:
9x19mm Glisenti
Length:
35.5in (90cm)
Weight:
8lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
 
25 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Abiel Revelli
Manufacturer(s):
Officine di Villar Perosa
Notes:
Also known as the OVP; often incorrectly identified as a WWI SMG
Armaguerra
Armaguerra Mod.35
Year:
1935
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Gino Revelli
Manufacturer(s):
Armaguerra
Notes:
N/A
Beretta Model 38
Beretta Mod.38
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.0in (94cm)
Weight:
7.5lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Adapted from self-loading carbine
Beretta Mod.38A 1
Beretta Mod.38A 2
Beretta Mod.38A
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
37.25in (94.6cm)
Weight:
9.25lb (4.20kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Detail improvement of Mod.38, adopted by the Italian Army in 1938
SossoSosso Year:
1940
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Giulio Sosso
Manufacturer(s):
Fabrica Nationale d'Armie Brescia
Notes:
Fed by high-capacity internal magazine located within stock
OrtolaniOrtolani Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Michele Ortolani, Bartolomeo Ortolani
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
First SMG to use roller-delayed blowback operation
Beretta Mod.1
Beretta Mod.1
Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.0in (71cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Modified Mod.38A designed to emulate MP40; built as a prototype only
Beretta 38/42
Beretta Mod.38/42
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Simplified version of Mod.38A
FNAB
FNA-B Mod.43
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.1in (79cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
400rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Fabrica Nationale d'Armie Brescia
Notes:
Features folding magazine
Variara
Variara
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.3in (82cm)
Weight:
6.2lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Covertly produced for CLN partisans
Albertini
Albertini
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.7in (83cm)
Weight:
7.72lb (3.50kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
650rpm
Designer(s):
Guiseppe Albertini
Manufacturer(s):
Isotta Fraschini
Notes:
Feeds from MP40 magazines
Beretta 38/44
Beretta Mod.38/44
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Further simplification of Mod.38A
OG44
Armaguerra OG44
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30.3in (77cm)
Weight:
6.8lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
525rpm
Designer(s):
Giovanni Oliani
Manufacturer(s):
Armaguerra
Notes:
Utilized L-shaped bolt housed over barrel
TZ-45TZ-45 Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.5in (85cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Toni Giandoso, Zorzoli Giandoso
Manufacturer(s):
Fabbrica Fratelli Giandoso
Notes:
Features early grip safety system
FDA
FDA
Year:
c.1948
Cartridge:
9x17mm
Length:
17.5in (44cm)
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Cesare Lercker
Manufacturer(s):
F.D.A.
Notes:
Compact, small-caliber machine pistol
Bernardelli VB
Bernardelli VB
Year:
1948
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
32.7in (83cm)
Weight:
7.4lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Vincenzo Bernardelli SpA
Notes:
Licensed copy of Beretta Mod.38/49
Beretta 38/49
Beretta Mod.38/49
Year:
1949
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Modified Mod.38/44 with bolt lock safety
Beretta Mod.2
Beretta Mod.2
Year:
1951
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Modified Mod.1 with bolt lock safety
GenarGenar PM410 Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
16.1in (41cm)
Weight:
4.3lb (2.0kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Toni Giandoso, Zorzoli Giandoso
Manufacturer(s):
Genar SpA
Notes:
N/A
Simmel WerkeSimmel PM720 Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.4in (72cm)
Weight:
5.1lb (2.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Toni Giandoso, Zorzoli Giandoso
Manufacturer(s):
Simmel Werke
Notes:
N/A
FNA-B X4FNA-B X4 Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26in (66cm)
Weight:
6.6lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Fabrica Nationale d'Armie Brescia
Notes:
N/A
FNA-B X5
FNA-B X5
Year:
1955
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
12.25in (31.1cm)
Weight:
6.3lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Fabrica Nationale d'Armie Brescia
Notes:
Extremely compact blowback SMG
Beretta Mod.3
Beretta Mod.3
Year:
1955
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.0in (71cm)
Weight:
7.6lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Features retractable stock, left-side cocking, and grip safety
Beretta Mod.4
Beretta Mod.4
Year:
1956
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.0in (71cm)
Weight:
7.6lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Tullio Marengoni
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Modified Mod.3 with redesigned stock and bayonet fittings
Beretta Mod.5
Beretta Mod.5
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.5in (80cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Modified Mod.38/49 with push safety device
Beretta Mod.6
Beretta Mod.6
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
24.8in (63cm)
Weight:
5.75lb (2.61kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Built as a prototype only
Beretta Mod.7
Beretta Mod.7
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Utilized L-shaped bolt housed over barrel
Beretta Mod.8
Beretta Mod.8
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Improved variant of Mod.7
Beretta Mod.10
Beretta Mod.10
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Prototype version of Mod.12
Franchi LF57
Franchi LF-57
Year:
1957
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26.75in (67.9cm)
Weight:
7.1lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Luigi Franchi SpA
Notes:
Utilized L-shaped bolt housed over barrel
Beretta Mod.12
Beretta Mod.12
Year:
1958
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25.4in (65cm)
Weight:
6.6lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Domenico Salza
Manufacturer(s):
Beretta
Notes:
Adopted by the Italian Army in 1961

Japan

After centuries of isolation, Japan was quick to industrialize under the reign of Emperor Meiji, and production of modern small arms was no exception. Most of Japan's arsenals were state-owned and produced rifles and machine guns exclusively for their own military and navy and the country did not export arms in large numbers. Development of an SMG in Japan began around 1927, when the Koishikawa Arsenal produced an 8mm prototype for military trials. This was unsuccessful, but in the mid-1930s the privately-owned Tokyo firm of Kijiro Nambu designed a line of rather innovative 8mm submachine guns, which were taken up in small numbers by the navy. When Japan invaded China in 1936 and experienced a series of bloody, close-quarters urban battles, the army asked for an indigenously-produced SMG. This was provided by Nambu in the form of the Type 100, which was Japan's mainstay submachine gun throughout World War II.

After their surrender in 1945, Japan considerably downsized their domestic arms industry, which since then has only existed to serve the country's own needs and is prohibited from exporting abroad. As such, there has been no real requirement after World War II for the Japanese to develop any submachine guns, but a few designs did emerge regardless.

Koishikawa M1927
Koishikawa M1927
Year:
1927

Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
27.0in (69cm)
Weight:
7.1lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
1200rpm
Designer(s):
Toshio Takazeki
 Manufacturer(s):
Koishikawa Arsenal
Notes:
First domestically-designed Japanese SMG, utilized tape belt feed
Koishikawa M1928
Koishikawa M1928
Year:
1928
Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
31.6in (80cm)
Weight:
7.3lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
18 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Toshio Takazeki
Manufacturer(s):
Koishikawa Arsenal
Notes:
Prototype designed to fire two-round bursts

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

Nambu Type I
Year:
1932
Cartridge:
6.5mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Nambu Arms Manufacturing Co.
Notes:
Few details survive
Nambu Type 1Nambu Type IIA
Year:
1934
Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
24.1 (62cm)
Weight:
6.17lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Shikanosuke Tokunaga
Manufacturer(s):
Nambu Arms Manufacturing Co.
Notes:
First production SMG to feed magazines through pistol grip; only produced in limited numbers
Type 2 Nambu Type IIB
Year:
1935
Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
27.6in (70cm)
Weight:
6.17lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
Shikanosuke Tokunaga
Manufacturer(s):
Nambu Arms Manufacturing Co.
Notes:
Redesigned version of the Type IIA with conventional magazine feed, produced in limited numbers
Type 100/40
 Nambu Type 100/40
Year:
1940
Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
35in (89cm)
Weight:
8.44lb (3.83kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
450rpm
Designer(s):
Kijiro Nambu
Manufacturer(s):
Nambu Arms Manufacturing Co., Kokura Arsenal,
Atsuta Arsenal
Notes:
Standard Japanese SMG of World War II, based on Bergmann design
Type 100/44
Nambu Type 100/44
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
8x22mm
Length:
35in (89cm)
Weight:
8.44lb (3.83kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
800rpm
Designer(s):
Kijiro Nambu
Manufacturer(s):
Atsuta Arsenal
Notes:
Cheaper variant of Type 100 with modified recoil spring and increased fire rate
SCK-65 SCK-65 & 66
Year:
1965
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76.3cm)
Weight:
9lb (4.8kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Shin Chuo Kogyo K.K.
Notes:
Featured integral muffler and magazine grip safety

Spain

Spain was a large producer of small arms, particularly pistols, in the early 20th century. However, it was not until 1934 that the Basque firm of Star Bonifacio Echeverria designed Spain's first SMG, which was marketed for domestic and export use. Production was immediately hampered by the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, during which the demand for SMGs increased significantly. Submachine guns used by the Nationalist and Republican factions included workshop-made models produced domestically, and foreign exports from the rest of Europe. After the war, Franco's government closed the vast majority of the Spanish gun manufacturers and only a few were left operational to serve the needs of the military and police. New submachine guns were developed at the state-owned CETME factory, and at Star, who offered a series of SMGs for export from the 1960s to the 1980s.

MX1935
Gollat MX1935
Year:
1935

Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
38.15in (96.9cm)
Weight:
10.50lb (4.75kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
800rpm
Designer(s):
Luis Pamolo Puyol
 Manufacturer(s):
Fca. Antonio Errasti
Notes:
Derived from Bergmann design
Star TN35
Star SI-35
Year:
1935
Cartridge:
9x23mm,
9x19mm,
9x17mm
Length:
35.4in (90.0cm)
Weight:
8.2lb (3.7kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
300 - 700rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Star Bonifacio Echeverria S.A.
Notes:
Utilized complex six-part fire selector, also marketed as "Atlantic"
Naranjero
Naranjero
Year:
1936
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
32.0in (81.0cm)
Weight:
8.8lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designers(s):
Hugo Schmeisser
Manufacturer(s):
Various
Notes:
Localized copy of the Haenel MP28.II
Labora 1938
Labora
Year:
1937
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
31.75in (80.6cm)
Weight:
9.3lb (4.2kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
750rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Industrias de Guerra de Cataluna
Notes:
Republican-designed SMG produced during Civil War; only a few thousand made
EMP M34
Coruna M41/44
Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
33.0in (84.0cm)
Weight:
10.58lb (4.8kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Heinrich Vollmer,
Berthold Geipel
Manufacturer(s):
Coruna Arsenal
Notes:
Licensed copy of the Erma MP34 submachine gun
Star Z45
Star Z45
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
33.8in (86.0cm)
Weight:
9.98lb (4.53kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
500rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Star Bonifacio Echeverria S.A.
Notes:
Based on the Erma MP40
ARMU STABLE
STABLE
Year:
1953
Cartridge:
.30 Carbine,
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Victor Sarasqueta
Notes:
Also known as the ARMU
ADASA
ADASA
Year:
1953
Cartridge:
9x23mm
Length:
31.95in (81.2cm)
Weight:
8.18lb (3.71kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Ludwig Vorgrimmler
Manufacturer(s):
Armamento De Aviacion S.A.
Notes:
Simple blowback SMG based on Soviet PPS-43
ARAC
ARAC
Year:
1954
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
34.75in (88.3cm)
Weight:
8.40lb (3.9kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
SOFAM
Notes:
Spanish Mauser rifle converted into 9mm blowback SMG
Parinco CI 3R
Parinco CI 3R
Year:
1959
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
9x23mm
Length:
31.50in (80.0cm)
Weight:
7.55kg (3.4kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Jesus Crespo Granja,
Eugenio Izquierdo
Manufacturer(s):
Parinco S.A.
Notes:
Basic blowback SMG with plastic body
Star Z62
Star Z62
Year:
1962
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
9x23mm
Length:
27.56in (70.0cm)
Weight:
5.84lb (2.65kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Isaac Irusta
Manufacturer(s):
Star Bonifacio Echeverria S.A.
Notes:
Lightweight blowback SMG with two-stage trigger
CETME CB-64
CETME CB-64
Year:
1964
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
9x23mm
Length:
28.0in (71.0cm)
Weight:
5.8lb (2.6kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Centro de Estudios Tecnicos de Materiales Especiales
Notes:
Externally similar to British Sterling SMG; also known as the CETME C2
Star Z70B
Star Z70B
Year:
1970
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Star Bonifacio Echeverria S.A.
Notes:
Improved version of Z62 SMG

Sweden

Although Sweden remained neutral during both World Wars, it maintained a domestic arms industry to supply its military in the event of an invasion attempt. During the 1930s the Swedish Army became interested in SMGs and imported Bergmann MP34 submachine guns from Denmark. They also acquired licenses from Finland to produce their KP/31 submachine gun. The Swedish KP/31, known as the M/37, became not only the standard submachine gun of their Army, but also was exported to many countries around the world. In 1945 the Carl Gustav factory produced their eponymous SMG, which was a very successful export product and set the expected standard for many post-war designs.

Husqvarna M37
Husqvarna M/37-39
Year:
1937

Cartridge:
9x20mm,
9x19mm
Length:
30.2in (76.8cm)
Weight:
8.75lb (3.97kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
900rpm
Designer(s):
Aimo Lahti
 Manufacturer(s):
Husqvarna Vapenfabriks AB,
Carl Gustav Gevarsfaktori
Notes:
Licensed copy of Suomi KP/31 SMG
Hovea M/44
Hovea M/44
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.27in (84.5cm)
Weight:
6.6lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
Husqvarna Vapenfabriks AB
Notes:
Built as a prototype only, later produced in Denmark
Carl Gustav M45
Carl Gustav M/45
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31.8in (81cm)
Weight:
7.6lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Gunnar Johnsson
Manufacturer(s):
Carl Gustav Gevarsfaktori
Notes:
Adopted by the Swedish Army in 1946
Balter
Balter
Year:
c.1950
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
36 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
B.G. Balter
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Improved version of Carl Gustav M/45 SMG; built as a prototype only

United Kingdom

As early as the 1890s, British-American inventor Hiram Maxim had developed a lightweight, man-portable version of the Maxim gun chambered for pistol cartridges. This precursor to the submachine gun was deployed for demonstration purposes only, and Maxim never developed the concept any further. Later, in 1915, the Italian Villar Perosa was demonstrated before British officials, who recognized its potential but vetoed against issuing a similar weapon to their troops. The British attitude towards the German MP18 was largely dismissive and it was seen as little more than a gimmicky weapon developed by a desperate foe. During the inter-war period, the Small Arms Committee investigated various submachine guns from around the world, including a few domestically-produced guns like the Dinely, Biwarip, and BSA-Thompson. As time went on the SAC's interest in submachine guns increased, but the Army High Command was vehemently against weapons of this type and rejected all comers, despite some early warnings that the Germans were turning out thousands of MP38 SMGs en masse.

When the war broke out in 1939, the British Army was without a submachine gun and the British Expeditionary Force in France hastily arranged field trials for various SMGs, quickly settling on the Ameriacan Thompson gun. After the BEF's retreat from Dunkirk in 1940, a domestic SMG program was quickly developed and the results of this were the Lanchester and Sten SMGs. The Sten was a technically poor but extremely cost-efficent and simple gun that could be manufactured in extremely high volumes, and it proved to be a great success, arming not only British troops but also resistance fighters across Europe. Its basic design saw it copied worldwide, both in factories and small workshops. After World War II, the British ditched the Sten in favor of a more polished gun, the Sterling, which was also very successful internationally.

BSA ThompsonBSA Thompson
Year:
1926
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
9x23mm,
.45 ACP,
7.63x25mm
Length:
32in (81cm)
Weight:
7.5lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
20 rounds
Rate of Fire:
1200rpm
Designer(s):
George Norman
 Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Licensed variant of the Thompson SMG, produced in Britain for the European market
Dinely
 Dineley
Year:
1932
Cartridge:
7.65x17mm
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
8.2lb (3.7kg)
Magazine:
20 rounds
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
Mark Dineley
Manufacturer(s):
Dineley & Dowding
Notes:
Used Ross rifle barrel
Soley SMG
Soley
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
15 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
John Ball(?)
Manufacturer(s):
Soley Arms Company
Notes:
Converted from Beretta 18-30 carbine; feeds magazines through pistol grip
Biwarip
Biwarip
Year:
1938
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26in (66cm)
Weight:
5.1lb (2.32kg)
Magazine:
 
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Designed to be fired with one hand; few details survive
BSA Kiraly
BSA-Kiraly
Year:
1939
Cartridge:
9x25mm
Length:
38.75in (98.4cm)
Weight:
8.5lb (3.9kg)
Magazine:
40 rounds
Rate of Fire:
730rpm
Designer(s):
Pal de Kiraly
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Designed in Hungary and produced in Britain; utilized flywheel-delayed trigger
Lanchester
Lanchester
Year:
1940
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.5in (85cm)
Weight:
9.6lb (4.4kg)
Magazine:
50 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
George H. Lanchester
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp., Royal Navy workshops
Notes:
Copy of German MP28
Lanchester X2 Lanchester X1/2
Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
20.75in (52.7cm)
Weight:
6.75lb (3.06kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
George H. Lanchester
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.
Notes:
Stripped-down and lightened version of Lanchester SMG; built as a prototype only
Sten
Sten Mk.I
Year:
1941
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.25in (84.5cm)
Weight:
7.2lb (3.3kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Featured folding foregrip; also produced without wooden furniture
Sten Mk.IISten Mk.II
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76cm)
Weight:
6.65lb (3.02kg)
Magazine:
 
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Simplified version of Sten Mk.I, issued in great numbers during World War II
Veseley Veseley V42
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33in (84cm)
Weight:
7.1lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
 
60 rounds
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
Josef Veseley
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Featured compartmentalized four-stack magazine
Jurek Mk.I
Jurek Mk.I
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
21in (53cm)
Weight:
5.4lb (2.4kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
1000rpm
Designer(s):
Marian Jurek
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
N/A

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

Marek 3J
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
 
156 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Jan Marek
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Burst-firing SMG with high-capacity magazine; few details survive
Norm
Norm
Year:
1942
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
29in (74cm)
Weight:
8.8lb (4.0kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Eric Norman
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Experimental weapon developed for the SOE; featured milled cocking slide and horizontal foregrip
Welgun
Welgun
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
6.5lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
760rpm
Designer(s):
Eric Norman
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Prototype designed on request of the SOE; featured plunger-type bolt moderator
Patchett Mk.I
Patchett Mk.I
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28in (71cm)
Weight:
6.2lb (2.8kg)
Magazine:
 
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.
Notes:
Fed from Sten magazines; saw limited issue during World War II for combat trials
Sten Mk.III
Sten Mk.III
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76cm)
Weight:
7.0lb (3.2kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
550rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield,
Line Bros. Ltd.
Notes:
Further simplification of Sten design, built from stamped steel components
Sten Mk.IV
Sten Mk.IVA
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
7.5lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
575rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Modified Sten with large trigger guard; never taken into service
Sten Mk.IVB
Sten Mk.IVB
Year:
1943
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
24.5in (62cm)
Weight:
7.5lb (3.4kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
575rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Compact machine pistol-type modified Sten; never taken into service
Sten Mk.V
Sten Mk.V
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
30in (76cm)
Weight:
8.6lb (3.9kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Issued to paratroopers in 1944; also produced without foregrip
Sten Mk.VI
Sten Mk.VI
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.75in (85.7cm)
Weight:
9.5lb (4.3kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
475rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin,
Reginald V. Shepherd,
Wikter A. Kulikowski
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Suppressed version of Sten Mk.V
ROFSTEN
Rofsten
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
31in (79cm)
Weight:
8.2lb (3.7kg)
Magazine:
22 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
Improved version of Sten design, built as a prototype only
Sterling Mk.II
Sterling Mk.II
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28in (71cm)
Weight:
6.0lb (2.7kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.,
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
Improved version of Patchett gun, adopted by the British Army as L2A1 in 1953
MCEM-1
MCEM-1
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
25in (64cm)
Weight:
6.4lb (2.9kg)
Magazine:
20 rounds (x2)
Rate of Fire:
700rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Derived from Sten design; featured twin magazines welded together
MCEM-2
MCEM-2
Year:
1944
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
14.25in (36.2cm)
Weight:
5.0lb (2.3kg)
Magazine:
18 rounds
Rate of Fire:
1000rpm
Designer(s):
Jerzey Podsedkowski
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Machine pistol-type SMG with wrap-around bolt design and detachable holster-stock
MCEM-3
MCEM-3
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28.75in (73cm)
Weight:
7.5in (3.4kg)
Magazine:
20 rounds
Rate of Fire:
690rpm
Designer(s):
Harold J. Turpin
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Improved version of MCEM-1

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

MCEM-4
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
No details survive

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

MCEM-5
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
No details survive
MCEM-6
MCEM-6
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26in (66cm)
Weight:
6.7lb (3.0kg)
Magazine:
18 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Jerzey Podsedkowski,
Aleksander Ichnatowicz
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Improved version of MCEM-2

NO IMAGE AVAILABLE

SPARC
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
N/A
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
Wikter A. Kulikowski
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Possibly related to MCEM project
Jurek Mk.II
Jurek Mk.II
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
17in (43cm)
Weight:
5.5lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
350rpm
Designer(s):
Marian Jurek
Manufacturer(s):
N/A
Notes:
Featured bolt delay system to reduce fire rate
BSA BSA Mk.I
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm,
.30 Carbine
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
5.6lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Claude A. Perry,
Roger D. Wackrow
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Cocked by pushing handguard forward; featured folding magazine
Viper Viper
Year:
1945
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
24in (61cm)
Weight:
6.8lb (3.1kg)
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
690rpm
Designer(s):
Derek A. Hutton-Williams
Manufacturer(s):
RSAF Enfield
Notes:
Designed to be fired one-handed
Rofgun
ROF Machine Pistol
Year:
1946
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Magazine:
32 rounds
Rate of Fire:
N/A
Designer(s):
N/A
Manufacturer(s):
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
N/A
BSA Mk.II
BSA Mk.II
Year:
1947
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
5.6lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Claude A. Perry,
Roger D. Wackrow
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Improved version of BSA SMG
BSA Mk.III
BSA Mk.III
Year:
1951
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
27.5in (70cm)
Weight:
5.6lb (2.5kg)
Magazine:
30 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Claude A. Perry,
Roger D. Wackrow
Manufacturer(s):
Birmingham Small Arms Ltd.
Notes:
Modified version of BSA SMG with bayonet fittings
Sterling Mk.III
Sterling Mk.III
Year:
1955
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28in (71cm)
Weight:
6.0lb (2.7kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.,
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
Detail improvement of Mk.II; very briefly adopted as L2A2
Sterling Mk.IV
Sterling Mk.IV
Year:
1955
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
28in (71cm)
Weight:
6.0lb (2.7kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.,
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
Improved version of Mk.III, adopted as L2A3; most numerous variant of Sterling SMG
Sterling Mk.V
Sterling Mk.V
Year:
1964
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
33.25in (84.5cm)
Weight:
7.7lb (3.5kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
475rpm
Designer(s):
George W. Patchett
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.,
ROF Fazackerley
Notes:
Suppressed version of Sterling Mk.IV, adopted as L34A1
Sterling S11
Sterling S11
Year:
1970
Cartridge:
9x19mm
Length:
26.75in (67.9cm)
Weight:
8.0lb (3.6kg)
Magazine:
34 rounds
Rate of Fire:
600rpm
Designer(s):
Frank Waters
Manufacturer(s):
Sterling Armaments Corp.
Notes:
Proposed as cheaper alternative to Sterling Mk.IV; built as a prototype only